A space for research, innovation, and development.

We have a dynamic and collaborative laboratory, thanks to its infrastructure and cutting-edge equipment.

FIRST,
WE ANALYSE

We work together with the Animal Production and Health Departments to intervene in the operation and study the bacteria relevant to each production system in the most representative way possible. Learning about the composition of the microbiome, relevant pathotypes, antibiotic resistance, and susceptibility patterns to commercial vaccines.

SECOND,
WE DEVELOP

We develop different applications of bacteriophages against identified bacteria. Tailored to our clients' industrial reality and the current regulations to be used with the required safety guarantees.

THIRD,
WE APPLY

We work together with the client in various application tests to adapt the use of phages to each production line or process stage and verify it's effectiveness.


THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF PHAGOTHERAPY.

We have reiterated that bacteriophages are highly selective in their action. But how do they work? Bacteriophages are composed of a capsid that stores and protects the viral DNA, a neck that functions like a syringe to introduce viral DNA into the bacterium and a receptor base, which fulfills two functions: 1. To activate the virus’ infection system on a bacterium and 2. To accurately recognize the host bacterium by interacting with unique surface elements of each bacterial variant.

Once the infection process has begun, the phage introduces its genetic material and quickly replicates, releasing enzymes that destabilize the cell membrane, releasing thousands of copies of it into the environment, causing the elimination of the target bacteria. Incredible, isn’t it?

Here are some of the bacteriophages that are part of the Phage Lab libraries:

INFECTIOUS CYCLE:

a.

When a pathogenic bacterium approaches, the phage can recognize membrane specific proteins.

b.

This allows it to anchor itself and generate the infection.

c.

The phage enters its genetic material and uses all its replicative machinery.

d.

It introduces itself to the bacteria and multiplies, creating various copies.

e.

Once replicated, the phages secrete enzymes.

f.

These enzymes destabilize the bacterial membrane causing its lysis.

g.

Bacterial lysis allows the release of multiple copies of phages ready to infect other pathogens and repeat the process.

PREVENTIVE USE OF BACTERIOPHAGES IN THE INTESTINE:


WHERE THERE ARE ANIMALS, THAT'S WHERE WE'LL BE.

Our treatments have a presence throughout Latin America and part of Europe, generating an impact on billions of animals from different industries.